● Cutaway of a typical French Gothic cathedral July 09, 2012 21:52

• Pinnacle – Sharply pointed ornament capping the piers or flying buttresses; also used on cathedral facades
• Flying buttresses – Masonry struts that transfer the trust of the nave vaults across the roofs of the side aisles and ambulatory to a tall pier rising above the church’s exterior wall
• Vaulting web – The masonry blocks that fill the area between the ribs of a groin vault
• Diagonal rib – In plan, one of the ribs that form the X of a groin vault.
• Transverse rib – A rib that crosses the nave or aisle at a 90-degree angle.
• Springing – The lowest stone of an arch; in Gothic vaulting, the lowest stone of a diagonal or transverse rib. 
• Clerestory – The windows below the vaults that form the nave elevation’s uppermost level. By using flying buttresses and rib vaults on pointed arches, Gothic architects could build huge clerestory windows and fill them with stained glass held in place by ornamental stonework called tracery.
• Oculus – A small round window
• Lancet – A tall, narrow window crowned by a pointed arch
• Triforium is a shallow arched gallery within the thickness of inner wall, which stands above the nave of a church or cathedral.
• Nave Arcade: The nave is the main body of the church. Main arcades.
• Compound pier with responds: is the architectural term given to a clustered column or pier which consists of a centre mass or newel, to which engaged or semi-detached shafts have been attached, in order to perform certain definite structural objects, such as to carry arches of additional orders, or to support the transverse or diagonal ribs of a vault, or the tie-beam of an important roof.